Turkish Journal of Gastroenterology
Original Article

Infections Developing in Patients Undergoing Liver Transplantation: Recipients of living donors may be more prone to bacterial/fungal infections

1.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

2.

Department of General Surgery, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

3.

Department of Medical Microbiology, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

4.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

5.

Division of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

6.

Department of Gastroenterology, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

7.

Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

8.

Department of Pathology, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

9.

Department of Radiology, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

10.

Director of Transplantation Council, Ege University School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey

Turk J Gastroenterol 2019; 1: -
DOI: 10.5152/tjg.2020.19286
Read: 123 Published: 04 May 2020
Background/Aims: Despite surgical advances in liver transplantation and effective prophylactic strategies, post-transplant infections are the most important cause of morbidity and mortality. Liver transplant recipients are at high risk of infection, with estimates of up to 80%. (1) Diagnosis and management of infections due to developing immunosuppression is difficult and adversely affects mortality. Our aim is to review bacterial, fungal infections in patients after liver transplantation and to reveal our resistance rates.

Materials and Methods: 107 patients undergoing liver transplantation between January 2017 and February 2018 were evaluated retrospectively with regard to demographic characteristics, causes of transplantation, conditions that may lead to infection, postoperative infections, pathogens and resistance patterns.

Results: Of the 107 patients who underwent liver transplantation, 48 (44.8%) had an infection. Bacterial infections were detected in 41% of the patients and fungal infections were found in 13% thereof. When we compared living and cadaveric transplants in terms of infection development, these rates were found to be 53% and 33%, respectively. (p= 0.034) No statistically significant results could be obtained when evaluating the conditions such as sex, presence of underlying primary disease, MELD score, diabetes status, TPN (total parenteral nutrition) and risk factors for infection.

Conclusion: After liver transplantation, infections are often seen in the first month of the postoperative period. Knowing the most common pathogens and resistance states in this process reduces infection-related deaths by providing appropriate treatment regimens at the right time.

EISSN 2148-5607