Turkish Journal of Gastroenterology
Original Article

Esophageal Mucosal Autograft for Preventing Stricture After Widespread Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection of Superficial Esophageal Lesions

1.

Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China

2.

Department of Gastroenterology, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Linhai, Zhejiang Province, China

3.

Key Laboratory of Minimally Invasive Techniques & Rapid Rehabilitation of Digestive System Tumor of Zhejiang Province, Linhai, Zhejiang Province, China

4.

Department of Pathology, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Linhai, Zhejiang Province, China

5.

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Linhai, Zhejiang Province, China

6.

Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China

Turk J Gastroenterol 2022; 33: 312-319
DOI: 10.5152/tjg.2021.201032
Read: 273 Downloads: 46 Published: 28 December 2021

Background: Although esophageal mucosal autograft prevents esophageal stricture after widespread endoscopic submucosal dissec- tion and has been reported as a new technique, it is relatively unproven in clinical practice. This prospective study was conducted to evaluate our experience using esophageal mucosal autograft to prevent strictures after widespread endoscopic submucosal dissection in patients with widespread superficial esophageal lesions.

Methods: Between October 2017 and June 2018, 15 patients with widespread superficial esophageal lesions were consecutively treated with widespread endoscopic submucosal dissection and then underwent esophageal mucosal autograft. The main outcomes measured included esophageal epithelialization and esophageal stricture.

Results: The median longitudinal diameter of the widespread superficial esophageal lesions was 5.2 cm. All 15 patients were success- fully treated with widespread endoscopic submucosal dissection and esophageal mucosal autograft, and the median procedural time was 182 minutes. During follow-up (median, 23 months), esophageal epithelialization was found in 13 patients (86.7%), and 7 patients experienced esophageal stricture (46.7%). In those 7 patients, the esophageal strictures were successfully relieved after endoscopic bal- loon dilation or endoscopic radial incision. No complications related to endoscopic balloon dilation/endoscopic radial incision occurred. Additionally, local recurrence was found in 1 patient with poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, and further surgical resection was performed.

Conclusions: Esophageal mucosal autograft appears to be an efficient approach to reconstructing local esophageal epithelium and might have a potential role in preventing esophageal stricture after widespread endoscopic submucosal dissection. However, as a new technique, it needs more improvement to enhance its role in preventing esophageal stricture after widespread endoscopic submucosal dissection.

Cite this article as: Zhang Y, Mao X, Zhu W, et al. Esophageal mucosal autograft for preventing stricture after widespread endoscopic submucosal dissection of superficial esophageal lesions. Turk J Gastroenterol. 2022;33(4):312-319.

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